MEXICAN AMERICAN PROFESSIONAL HALL OF FAME

sandracalles

Sandra Calles, PhD

Dr. Sandra Calles is a psychologist, educator, life coach, mentor and activist. Her passion is to advocate for causes she believes in, teach about mental health topics, and guide others, so they may achieve success in their personal and career endeavors.

She has over 11 years of experience as a mental health professional having worked at various mental health facilities. Most recently she was a therapist at Los Angeles Harbor College at the Life Skills Center. While at Harbor College, she helped many students overcome emotional obstacles so they could transfer to universities and meet their career goals. She devotes her personal and professional life to political causes, and activities that promote mental health, women’s issues, the empowerment of Latinas through education, business ownership, financial literacy and political engagement. Dr. Sandra is a graduate of California State University, Dominguez Hills, earning both a BA in Human Services and an MA in Clinical Psychology. She earned her doctorate from Saybrook University in Psychology, where she developed a treatment modality from her research on survivors of sudden cardiac death. The treatment plan known as PROSPER, is an acronym detailing a healing plan that can be applied to survivors of various traumas and is the underpinning for the work she does with her clients..... Continue Reading

Slow and Steady Progress for Mexican American Professionals: The results of the American surveys for the years 2010-2012 show positive results

By Humberto Gutierrez
Edited by Kristen House

College enrollment showed an increase of 1.4 percent from 2010 to 2012—a positive sign for Mexican Americans wanting to achieve higher academic and professional goals. Here is the data.

Educational attainment shows no change to the . . . → Read More: Slow and Steady Progress for Mexican American Professionals: The results of the American surveys for the years 2010-2012 show positive results

Employment & Job News 2014: US Employers Hire 321,000 Employees in November; Latino Unemployment Drops Slightly

Employment & Job News 2014: US Employers Hire 321,000 Employees in November; Latino Unemployment Drops Slightly
U.S. employers hired 321,000 people in November, the latest sign of steady growth and health job gains. The latest job figures mean 2014 is on track to be the strongest year for hiring since 1999, and 10 million jobs were lost . . . → Read More: Employment & Job News 2014: US Employers Hire 321,000 Employees in November; Latino Unemployment Drops Slightly

Hopeful Gains in Higher Education for Mexican Americans

By Humberto Gutierrez
Edited by Kristen House

The latest figures from the 2013 American Community Survey show progress in the wide gap between the total US professional population and Mexican Americans:

2012 college and/or graduate enrollment was 28.8% for the total population but only 18.2% for Mexican Americans.
2013 college and/or graduate enrollment was 28.3% for . . . → Read More: Hopeful Gains in Higher Education for Mexican Americans

Upscale and Affluent Latinos Are Tech Savvy, Bilingual and Big Spenders

Upscale and Affluent Latinos Are Tech Savvy, Bilingual and Big Spenders
By Nicole Akoukou Thompson (n.thompson@latinpost.com)
First Posted: Jul 25, 2014 01:17 PM EDT
Guests attend a launch event for Kiva City D.C. hosted by Capital One, Kiva, and the Latino Economic Development Center on January 8, 2013 in Washington, DC
Savvy, affluent and upscale Latinos have soaring purchasing power, . . . → Read More: Upscale and Affluent Latinos Are Tech Savvy, Bilingual and Big Spenders

Yahoo Diversity Figures Show Lack of Blacks, Hispanics

Yahoo has released information on the diversity of its workforce, and like Google it has a lot of room for improvement.
Last month, Google revealed that only 2% of its workforce was Black, 3% Hispanic and women only 30%.
Yahoo has followed suit by publishing its workforce diversity figures, and they are along the same lines. Women make . . . → Read More: Yahoo Diversity Figures Show Lack of Blacks, Hispanics