MEXICAN AMERICAN PROFESSIONAL HALL OF FAME

sandracalles

Sandra Calles, PhD

Dr. Sandra Calles is a psychologist, educator, life coach, mentor and activist. Her passion is to advocate for causes she believes in, teach about mental health topics, and guide others, so they may achieve success in their personal and career endeavors.

She has over 11 years of experience as a mental health professional having worked at various mental health facilities. Most recently she was a therapist at Los Angeles Harbor College at the Life Skills Center. While at Harbor College, she helped many students overcome emotional obstacles so they could transfer to universities and meet their career goals. She devotes her personal and professional life to political causes, and activities that promote mental health, women’s issues, the empowerment of Latinas through education, business ownership, financial literacy and political engagement. Dr. Sandra is a graduate of California State University, Dominguez Hills, earning both a BA in Human Services and an MA in Clinical Psychology. She earned her doctorate from Saybrook University in Psychology, where she developed a treatment modality from her research on survivors of sudden cardiac death. The treatment plan known as PROSPER, is an acronym detailing a healing plan that can be applied to survivors of various traumas and is the underpinning for the work she does with her clients..... Continue Reading

General M-A Professional News

MEXICAN AMERICAN FIRST-GENERATION STUDENTS’ PERCEPTIONS OF SIBLINGS AND ADDITIONAL FACTORS INFLUENCING THEIR COLLEGE CHOICE PROCESS

D Elias McAllister – 2012
… Title of Document: MEXICAN AMERICAN FIRST- GENERATION STUDENTS’ PERCEPTIONS
OF SIBLINGS AND ADDITIONAL FACTORS INFLUENCING THEIR COLLEGE CHOICE PROCESS …
choice process of Mexican American first-generation students who had an older …
Link to dissertation

The workers’ camp versus Main Street: then and now in the Mexican-American neighborhoods of the non-metro Midwest

S Dieterlen – Journal of Urbanism: International Research on …, 2012
… characteristics that support this idea include the very high percentages of Mexican-American/
Spanish-language businesses and institutions, their adherence to local non-Hispanic white
appearance standards, the specialized businesses and professional services, the low …
Link to article

New Spanish immersion program in Mexico, offers to take advantage of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP)

San Francisco Chronicle
It’s obvious the bilateral relationship between Mexico and the United States is stronger than ever, but this will have impacts in both economies and cultures and a mexican Spanish school offers a competitive advantage for American professionals. Aiming …
See all stories on this topic »
Link to article

IAEE Announces Patricia Farias-Barlow as 2012 IAEE Krakoff Leadership Institute Legend of the Industry

Exhibitor Online
Presently she is the official representative of Messe Dusseldorf for Mexico and serves various clients in Mexico and Latin America on diverse issues pertaining to international affairs, show management issues and training as well as consulting for …
Link to article

Thomson Reuters Recognizes Leading Mexican Researchers for Their Contributions to Science and Innovation

Reuters
Research in Science and Social Sciences/Arts & Humanities further progress in food technology, health and psychology MEXICO CITY, MEXICO, March 16, 2012 – The Intellectual Property & Science business of Thomson Reuters recognized the most highly cited
Link to article

East L.A. Blowouts: Walking Out for Justice in the Classrooms

KCET (blog)
During the 1950s college educated and professional Chicanos, as part of the Education Committee of the Council of Mexican Americans Affairs, challenged the school system through proper channels, including PTA participation and meetings with school …
Link to article

RESULTS OF THE AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY FOR 2010: a comparison of the total population of the United States and Mexican professionals

By HUMBERTO (TITO) GUTIERREZ
Edited by Carol Ponzio
Graphs by Mara Ann Fuller

The total population of the United States is 309,349,689.

The Mexican American population is 32,929,683, roughly about 11% of the total population.

The following are the results of a partial comparison of these two groups for professional occupations.

FOR EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT:

  • The 2010 Graduate or professional degree was 10.4% for the total population.
  • The 2009 Graduate or professional degree was 10.3% for the total population, a gain of .1% for the total population.
  • The 2010 Graduate or professional degree was 2.6% for Mexican Americans.
  • The 2009 Graduate or professional degree was 2.5% for Mexican Americans, also, a gain of .1%, however the gap is still 7.2% between the total population and Mexican American educational achievement in professional degrees.

Educational Attainment - Grad & Prof Degrees - U.S. Population vs. Mexican American

These numbers have remained steady for the last two years, but when we look at the breakdown for men vs. women, the numbers are very different.

The 2009 number for male bachelor’s degrees or higher for the total population were 28.4% vs. 8.2% for Mexican Americans.

The 2009 number for female bachelor’s degrees or higher for the total population were 27.4% vs. 9.9% for Mexican American women. The difference between male and female for the total population in 2009 was in favor of males 28.4% vs. 27.4% for females. Males have a 1% advantage. In 2009 there was a 1.7% gap in favor of Mexican American females, 9.9% for women vs. 8.2% for men, a 1.7% advantage for women.

The 2010 number for male bachelor’s degree or higher for the total population was 28.5% vs. 8.4% for Mexican Americans.

The 2010 number for female bachelor’s degree or higher for the total population was 27.9% vs. 10.4% for Mexican Americans. The difference between male and female for the total population in 2010 was in favor of males, 28.5% vs. 27.9% for females, but the gap has narrowed to .6% between the genders, down from 1% in 2009. For Mexican American males the gap in 2010 is 8.4% vs. 10.4% for females, a gap of 2% in favor of females, which have gained from 1.7% in 2009 to 2.0% in 2010.

Educational Attainment - Bachelor Degrees - U.S. Population vs. Mexican American

OCCUPATIONS: Male civilian employed 16 years and over:

  • In 2009, management professional and related occupations results were: 32.6% for the total population, vs.12.2% for Mexican Americans.
  • In 2010, management professional and related occupations results were: 32.8% for the total population, vs. 12.4% for Mexican Americans. The ratios have remained close for these groups. A gain of .2% by both groups, but Mexican American men are underrepresented by 20.4%, as compared with the total population.

OCCUPATIONS: Female civilian employed 16 years and over:

  • In 2009, management professional and related occupations: total population, 39.1%, Mexican American, 21.4%.
  • In 2010, management professional and related occupations: total population, 39.4%, Mexican American, 21.7%.

As a general statement the gap between the total population and women is narrower than with men. For women it’s only 17.7% instead of 20.4% for men. What is also of interest is the percentage of women vs. men in this group, which is 9.3% if favor of Mexican American women over Mexican American men.

Educational Attainment - Grad & Prof Degrees - U.S. Population vs. Mexican American

INDUSTRY: Civilian employed population 16 years and older:

  • In 2009, the results for professional, scientific, management, administrative and waste management services were 10.6% for the total populations vs. 10.1% for Mexican American.
  • In 2010, the results for professional scientific, and management, and administrative waste management services were 10.6% for the total population vs. 10.1% for Mexican American population. The numbers have remained the same and are one area, which shows equality between the total population and Mexican American population.

For public administration:

  • In 2009, the total population was 4.8% in public administration and 3.2% for Mexican Americans.
  • In 2010, the total population was 5.2% in public administration and, 3.5% for Mexican Americans. This comparison shows that Mexican Americans lost .1% in this category.

SUMMARY

Ratios of professional employment have remained the same for the total population of the United States vs. the Mexican American population. To a large extent, Mexican American professionals remain underrepresented among professionals in general, but Mexican American women have gained ground in some areas.

Reference Documents from the U.S. Census Bureau

 


  

Photo Collections
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Selected photos England and Belgium, 2016

8-2

Selected photos Filoli Gardens, Spring 2017, Spain, England, and Belgium

You may purchase any photo from the Photos Collections for $.99 each. Please email betohg2012@gmail.com with your order request.

Poem
“…And would it have been worth it, after all,
Would it have been worth while,
After the sunsets and the dooryards and the sprinkled streets,
After the novels, after the teacups, after the skirts that trail along the floor—
And this, and so much more?—
It is impossible to say just what I mean!
But as if a magic lantern threw the nerves in patterns on a screen:
Would it have been worth while…”

T.S. Eliot
The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

Press Release

2015 Annual Report on Mexican American Professionals Now Available

The 2015 Annual Report on Mexican American Professionals is now available on Mexican-American-Proarchive.com.

News from the 2015 American Community Service shows good increases in the numbers of Mexican Americans attending college, achieving educational attainment, and holding jobs in industries including science, management, and business.

• Mexican American college enrollment increased from 18.7% to 18.9% between 2014 and 2015
• Graduate or professional degree attainment among Mexican Americans rose from 2.9% to 3.0%
• The number of Mexican Americans achieving bachelor’s degrees rose from 7.6% to 7.8% in 2015

Despite these numbers, Mexican Americans are still near the bottom of college enrollment and educational attainment by race and ethnicity.

The University of California is proactive in pushing for a greater number of underrepresented minorities. The number Chicano/Latino students attending UOC increased by 2.7% since 2014; this group now makes up 32.3% of admitted university freshmen.

In terms of occupations, the number of Mexican Americans making up part of the management, business, science, and art occupations continues to rise, from 16.6% to 17.5% from 2012 to 2015. Mexican Americans have also seen consistent numbers in the professional, scientific, management, administrative, and waste management services occupations, keeping steady at 10.2% of all jobs in these fields held by Mexican Americans.

These numbers represent continuing gains in higher education and professional jobs for Mexican Americans. For more, visit Mexican-American-Proarchive.com.