MEXICAN AMERICAN PROFESSIONAL HALL OF FAME

sandracalles

Sandra Calles, PhD

Dr. Sandra Calles is a psychologist, educator, life coach, mentor and activist. Her passion is to advocate for causes she believes in, teach about mental health topics, and guide others, so they may achieve success in their personal and career endeavors.

She has over 11 years of experience as a mental health professional having worked at various mental health facilities. Most recently she was a therapist at Los Angeles Harbor College at the Life Skills Center. While at Harbor College, she helped many students overcome emotional obstacles so they could transfer to universities and meet their career goals. She devotes her personal and professional life to political causes, and activities that promote mental health, women’s issues, the empowerment of Latinas through education, business ownership, financial literacy and political engagement. Dr. Sandra is a graduate of California State University, Dominguez Hills, earning both a BA in Human Services and an MA in Clinical Psychology. She earned her doctorate from Saybrook University in Psychology, where she developed a treatment modality from her research on survivors of sudden cardiac death. The treatment plan known as PROSPER, is an acronym detailing a healing plan that can be applied to survivors of various traumas and is the underpinning for the work she does with her clients..... Continue Reading

Literature

Lost and Found

You might say there was something lost in translation when Santa Barbara named a street Canon Perdido. It should have been Cañon Perdido, after a cannon that disappeared on the beach in 1848. Without that Spanish enye Canon Perdido means something entirely different.
That twist of meaning is the theme of “Canon Perdido: XX Colloquium on Mexican Literature,” a three-day conference presented by the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at UC Santa Barbara. “We are playing with literary canon that is lost,” explained Sara Poot-Herrera, a professor in the department…
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English graduate student wins Ford Foundation Dissertation Fellowship

Cesar Soto wants to know how the spark of political revolution can transform religious concepts of community and inclusion.
To better understand the issue, he’s turning to the literature of England, Ireland, and Mexico in the late 1700s and early 1800s.César Soto wants to know how the spark of political revolution can transform religious concepts of community and inclusion.
Soto, a Ph.D. candidate in Notre Dame’s Department of English, has been awarded a Ford Foundation Dissertation Fellowship for 2016-17 to support his project.
The fellowships recognize graduate students who have demonstrated superior academic achievement, show promise as future scholars and teachers at a college or university level, and are prepared to use diversity as a resource to enrich the education of all students…
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4 Academic Agency in Ya Novels by Mexican American Women Authors

V Canales – Gender (ed) Identities: Critical Readings of Gender …, 2016 – books.google.com
The theme of academic achievement intention in contemporary young adult literature (YAL)
by Mexican American women authors demonstrates seizing power previously denied to
Mexican American youth and adolescents. A century ago, children of Mexican origin in the …
Link to book preview

4 Academic Agency in Ya Novels by Mexican American Women Authors

V Canales – Gender (ed) Identities: Critical Readings of Gender …, 2016 – books.google.com
The theme of academic achievement intention in contemporary young adult literature (YAL)
by Mexican American women authors demonstrates seizing power previously denied to
Mexican American youth and adolescents. A century ago, children of Mexican origin in the …
Link to article

Young Latina Poet’s Ode to Her Heritage Goes Viral

Xochitl Morales may be young, but she learned early to use her voice to highlight her community and culture. Through poetry, the sixteen year old demonstrates what it means to be a Mexican American. Her video poem, titled “Latino-Americanos: The Children of An Oscuro Pasado” addresses her cultural identity.
The video went viral and has been shared widely on Facebook and other social media, as well as by Latino sites. The poem is a response to Donald Trump’s comments about Mexicans in the U.S. “My culture is important, although it wasn’t always accepted. This poem is a call to action, it a reminder to never forget where you come from” Morales said…
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CantoMundo – celebration of Latino poetry is moving to New York

For the past five years, audiences in Austin have been able to enjoy public readings of CantoMundo, a national organization of Latino poets and poetry.
But this may be the last year CantoMundo is held in Austin, where they will hold two public readings July 22 and 23. Next year, it is moving to New York, where one of the founders, Deborah Paredez, recently accepted a professorship. The retreat may be held again in Austin in the future, but that’s uncertain…
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2 Brilliantly Written Novels From Mexico Head Up A Wave Of Literary Talent

To judge from our media coverage, you’d think that Mexico isn’t so much a country as a problem. But if you look beyond the endless talk of drug wars and The Wall, you discover that Mexico has a booming culture.
In recent years, there’s been an explosion of literary talent — from the sly provocateur Mario Bellatin to the brainy and funny Valeria Luiselli. This writing makes most American literary fiction feel pale and cannily packaged…
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Critical Content Analysis of Children’s and Young Adult Literature

CM Martínez-Roldán – Critical Content Analysis of Children’s and Young Adult …, 2016
… Nevertheless, whether pochismos are seen as positive or negative, the language used by the
Chihuahuas in the series misrepresents pocho language and Mexican Americans’ linguistic
practices and does not correspond to the literary bilingualism used by Chicano authors to …
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Spotlight on U.S. Hispanic Writers

The Hispanic Division and the Poetry and Literature Center at the Library of Congress have launched a collaborative series of recorded interviews, “Spotlight on U.S. Hispanic Writers.” This series is co-sponsored by Letras Latinas, the literary program of the Institute for Latino Studies at the University of Notre Dame.
“Spotlight on U.S. Hispanic Writers” features emerging and established American poets and prose writers of Hispanic descent who write predominantly in English. In each segment the featured poet or writer participates in a moderated discussion with the chief of the Hispanic Division, as well as reads from his or her work.
This series continues the tradition of the Hispanic Division Archive of Hispanic Literature on Tape (AHLOT). The AHLOT is an ongoing collection of recorded interviews and readings of contemporary poets and prose writers from the Iberian Peninsula, Latin America, the Caribbean, and U.S. Hispanics, which has been compiled by this Division since the 1940s…
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First Latino Newbery Medal Award winner set to visit Lee County Library

TUPELO – As the first Latino to win the prestigious Newbery Medal, Matt de la Peña writes stories that take place on the “other side of the tracks” by exploring identity and living as a young biracial boy.
De la Peña, author of the 2016 Newbery Medal award winner “The Last Stop on Market Street,” will visit the Lee County Library on April 11 to open up a conversation at the Helen Foster Lecture Series…
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Photo Collections
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Selected photos England and Belgium, 2016

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Selected photos Filoli Gardens, Spring 2017, Spain, England, and Belgium

You may purchase any photo from the Photos Collections for $.99 each. Please email betohg2012@gmail.com with your order request.

Poem
“…And would it have been worth it, after all,
Would it have been worth while,
After the sunsets and the dooryards and the sprinkled streets,
After the novels, after the teacups, after the skirts that trail along the floor—
And this, and so much more?—
It is impossible to say just what I mean!
But as if a magic lantern threw the nerves in patterns on a screen:
Would it have been worth while…”

T.S. Eliot
The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

Press Release

2015 Annual Report on Mexican American Professionals Now Available

The 2015 Annual Report on Mexican American Professionals is now available on Mexican-American-Proarchive.com.

News from the 2015 American Community Service shows good increases in the numbers of Mexican Americans attending college, achieving educational attainment, and holding jobs in industries including science, management, and business.

• Mexican American college enrollment increased from 18.7% to 18.9% between 2014 and 2015
• Graduate or professional degree attainment among Mexican Americans rose from 2.9% to 3.0%
• The number of Mexican Americans achieving bachelor’s degrees rose from 7.6% to 7.8% in 2015

Despite these numbers, Mexican Americans are still near the bottom of college enrollment and educational attainment by race and ethnicity.

The University of California is proactive in pushing for a greater number of underrepresented minorities. The number Chicano/Latino students attending UOC increased by 2.7% since 2014; this group now makes up 32.3% of admitted university freshmen.

In terms of occupations, the number of Mexican Americans making up part of the management, business, science, and art occupations continues to rise, from 16.6% to 17.5% from 2012 to 2015. Mexican Americans have also seen consistent numbers in the professional, scientific, management, administrative, and waste management services occupations, keeping steady at 10.2% of all jobs in these fields held by Mexican Americans.

These numbers represent continuing gains in higher education and professional jobs for Mexican Americans. For more, visit Mexican-American-Proarchive.com.