MEXICAN AMERICAN PROFESSIONAL HALL OF FAME

Mario Molina

Mario Molina, Chemist, Scientist, Nobel Prize Winner

Physical chemist Mario Molina was interested in science at an early age and created his own chemistry lab in a bathroom at his home.

After completing his studies in Mexico and Germany, he moved to the United States to obtain an advanced degree in physical chemistry at the U.C. Berkeley.

He won a Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1995 for his work on the effects of man-made compounds on the ozone layer... Continue reading

Published on Biography.com

Raciolinguistics” How Language Shapes our Ideas about Race

AF Ball – 2016
… Gordon, University of Arizona 3. From Mock Spanish to Inverted Spanglish: Language Ideologies
and the Racialization of Mexican and Puerto … University of South Carolina 5.“Suddenly Faced
with a Chinese Village”: The Linguistic Racialization of Asian Americans 97 adrienne …
Link to book . . . → Read More: Raciolinguistics” How Language Shapes our Ideas about Race

HOW DO HISTORY AND RELIGION AFFECT THE READING HABITS AND PRACTICES OF LATINO STUDENTS?

DL Moguel – the Social Studies, 2016
… Paz argued that Mexican Catholicism, a combination of Spanish and indigenous traditions, had
different approaches than European Protestantism toward freedom of … By surveying over 35
thousand Americans over the age of 18, the 2014 Survey has found the following (Pew …
Link to . . . → Read More: HOW DO HISTORY AND RELIGION AFFECT THE READING HABITS AND PRACTICES OF LATINO STUDENTS?

Mexican Business Culture in Trade Books

CM Coria-Sánchez – Mexican Business Culture: Essays on Tradition, Ethics, …, 2016
… Although this study is quite biased by making generalizations such as “It is because Mex- icans
and Mexican Americans tend to be poor and not well educated that they are fatal- istic,” the
analysis shows that “when social class is controlled, Mexicans are not more fatalistic . . . → Read More: Mexican Business Culture in Trade Books

8 Latino business founders breaking down barriers

Making their million-dollar mark
Latino-founded businesses are booming, yet less than 2 percent of Latino entrepreneurs ever make it past the $1 million revenue mark, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Of the 1.4 million Latino-owned companies in the United States, the average has $156,000 in annual sales, revealed a study from the Latin Business Action Network . . . → Read More: 8 Latino business founders breaking down barriers

Why so few Latino-owned businesses get venture capital funding

In the world of venture capital, Latino-owned businesses are rarer than billion dollar unicorns.
Only about 1% of all Latino-owned businesses created between 2007 and 2012 in the U.S. received venture capital or angel investments, according to a report by the Stanford Graduate School of Business that surveyed roughly 1,800 businesses.
One big reason: Very few Latino-owned firms . . . → Read More: Why so few Latino-owned businesses get venture capital funding